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380 What If We Make Ourselves The Center Of Our Talk In Japan?

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Manage episode 410031114 series 2950797
Kandungan disediakan oleh Greg Story and Dale Carnegie Training. Semua kandungan podcast termasuk episod, grafik dan perihalan podcast dimuat naik dan disediakan terus oleh Greg Story and Dale Carnegie Training atau rakan kongsi platform podcast mereka. Jika anda percaya seseorang menggunakan karya berhak cipta anda tanpa kebenaran anda, anda boleh mengikuti proses yang digariskan di sini https://ms.player.fm/legal.

Where is the line between referencing our experiences and insights and just talking about ourselves? I attended a talk recently where the speaker had a perspective to share with the audience, to add value to their careers and businesses. What surprised me was how much of the talk was cantered on the speaker rather than the audience. I was thinking about this later and wondered what the better balance would be? When we go on about ourselves, we are getting further away from points of relevance for the listeners. We have to remember that people are unapologetically 100% focused on themselves and their own interests and don’t care all that much about our story.

As the speaker, the closer we can align what we are saying to the listener’s interests, the greater the acceptance of what we are saying and the bigger the impact we will have as the presenter. That is fine in theory, but we can’t just make a series of pompous statements about how things should be and not back them up with evidence. Often that evidence is coming from our own experiences and that can be the most convincing variety. Unveiling a lot of sexy data during the talk is interesting, but a mud and blood rendition of what happened to us in the trenches, is always more gripping and compelling. This speaker, in my mind, strayed across the line and was wallowing in too much self-indulgence about what they had been doing.

How do we balance our story with the audience's need for alignment with their benefit? What the speaker could have done was better draw out how to transfer their learnings into concrete examples, where the listeners could apply them to their own circumstances. Instead of just saying this is what I did, and this is how it worked for me, they could have gone a bit deeper on the application for others who are not them. When the example is too idiosyncratic, the agency for others becomes diminished or diluted.

We could say, “I did this and got this result. Now here are three ways you could take this same idea and apply it to your situation”. We have now crossed over to the audience’s application of the knowledge. By giving more than one opportunity, we are more likely to hit on what the majority of audience members are looking for. Importantly, by prior analysis of who is showing up the talk, we can anticipate common needs and circumstances. This allows us to get closer to the mark of listener reality when we explain our examples.

A simple rule of thumb should be 20% of what happened to us and 80% of the time on explaining why this will work for our audience. Our speaker, in this case, reversed those percentages and spent the majority of the time talking about what happened to them. The problem with this is we in the audience are not them and we have to parse out what we can apply from their story. It is much better of the speaker saves us that drama and they tell us what we can apply.

We draw out the key points we want to make for the audience, align our war stories with the points and then add a significant section in the talk on explaining why doing this is a great idea and specifically why it is a great idea bolstered with concrete cases and options. This is an unbeatable combination. We demonstrate in words that because we did it, they can, too. We draw out how it will work for the audience and convince them that it has a broader application than just working for us alone. We have to marshal the benefits of taking our advice, and the more concretely we can do that, the better.

Our speaker convinced us that it worked for them, but failed to make the case that it would work for us. They hinted at it, but statements are cheap and we sceptical folk want more evidence. We are all risk averse, so we want chapter and verse and solid provable details.

When constructing the talk, keep that 20%-80% dichotomy in mind. Certainly use ourselves as proof, but don’t rely on it exclusively. If we can talk about others doing marvellous things with our advice, that is the icing on the cake. We love to hear case studies and then draw our own conclusions on how much we can take from the example and apply it in our world. That idea is something we need to be constantly hammering away at too. Keep telling them to think how they can adapt it, and apply it for themselves. In this way, we can keep switching the focus back to the audience away from us and we will get the balance right.

Would the people who know you or meet you describe you as persuasive? Do you think you are persuasive enough? Persuasion power is the most important, but the most commonly lacking skill in the business world. Do it yourself trial and error wastes time and resources. It is time to change things up and get that key skill. There is a perfect solution for you- to LEARN MORE click here (https://bit.ly/3VhvR2B )

To get your free guide “How To Stop Wasting Money On Training” click here ( https://bit.ly/4agbvLj )

To get your free “Goal Setting Blueprint 2.0” click here (https://bit.ly/43o5FVK)

If you enjoy our content, then head over to www.dale-carnegie.co.jp and check out our Japanese and English seminars, workshops, course information and schedules and our whitepapers, guidebooks, training videos, podcasts, blogs.

About The Author

Dr. Greg Story, President Dale Carnegie Tokyo Training

Contact me at greg.story@dalecarnegie.com

Bestselling author of “Japan Sales Mastery” (the Japanese translation is "The Eigyo" (The営業), “Japan Business Mastery” and "Japan Presentations Mastery" and his new books "How To Stop Wasting Money On Training" and the translation "Toreningu De Okane Wo Muda Ni Suru No Wa Yamemashoo" (トレーニングでお金を無駄にするのは止めま

Dr. Greg Story is an international keynote speaker, an executive coach, and a thought leader in the four critical areas for business people: leadership, communication, sales and presentations. He leads the Dale Carnegie Franchise in Tokyo which traces its roots straight back to the very establishment of Dale Carnegie in Japan in 1963 by Mr. Frank Mochizuki.

He publishes daily blogs on LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter

Has 6 weekly podcasts:

1. Mondays - The Leadership Japan Series,

2. Tuesdays – The Presentations Japan Series

Every second Tuesday - ビジネス達人の教え

3. Wednesdays - The Sales Japan Series

4. Thursdays – The Leadership Japan Series

Also every second Thursday - ビジネスプロポッドキャスト

5. Fridays - The Japan Business Mastery Show

6. Saturdays – Japan’s Top Business Interviews

Has 3 weekly TV shows on YouTube:

1. Mondays - The Cutting Edge Japan Business Show

Also every Second Thursday - ビジネスプロTV

2. Fridays – Japan Business Mastery

3. Saturdays – Japan Top Business Interviews

In the course of his career Dr. Greg Story has moved from the academic world, to consulting, investments, trade representation, international diplomacy, retail banking and people development.

Growing up in Brisbane, Australia he never imagined he would have a Ph.D. in Japanese decision-making, become a 39 year veteran of Japan and run his own company in Tokyo.

Since 1971, he has been a disciple of traditional Shitoryu Karate (糸東流) and is currently a 6th Dan.

Bunbu Ryodo (文武両道-both pen & sword) is his mantra and he applies martial art philosophies and strategies to business.

  continue reading

395 episod

Artwork
iconKongsi
 
Manage episode 410031114 series 2950797
Kandungan disediakan oleh Greg Story and Dale Carnegie Training. Semua kandungan podcast termasuk episod, grafik dan perihalan podcast dimuat naik dan disediakan terus oleh Greg Story and Dale Carnegie Training atau rakan kongsi platform podcast mereka. Jika anda percaya seseorang menggunakan karya berhak cipta anda tanpa kebenaran anda, anda boleh mengikuti proses yang digariskan di sini https://ms.player.fm/legal.

Where is the line between referencing our experiences and insights and just talking about ourselves? I attended a talk recently where the speaker had a perspective to share with the audience, to add value to their careers and businesses. What surprised me was how much of the talk was cantered on the speaker rather than the audience. I was thinking about this later and wondered what the better balance would be? When we go on about ourselves, we are getting further away from points of relevance for the listeners. We have to remember that people are unapologetically 100% focused on themselves and their own interests and don’t care all that much about our story.

As the speaker, the closer we can align what we are saying to the listener’s interests, the greater the acceptance of what we are saying and the bigger the impact we will have as the presenter. That is fine in theory, but we can’t just make a series of pompous statements about how things should be and not back them up with evidence. Often that evidence is coming from our own experiences and that can be the most convincing variety. Unveiling a lot of sexy data during the talk is interesting, but a mud and blood rendition of what happened to us in the trenches, is always more gripping and compelling. This speaker, in my mind, strayed across the line and was wallowing in too much self-indulgence about what they had been doing.

How do we balance our story with the audience's need for alignment with their benefit? What the speaker could have done was better draw out how to transfer their learnings into concrete examples, where the listeners could apply them to their own circumstances. Instead of just saying this is what I did, and this is how it worked for me, they could have gone a bit deeper on the application for others who are not them. When the example is too idiosyncratic, the agency for others becomes diminished or diluted.

We could say, “I did this and got this result. Now here are three ways you could take this same idea and apply it to your situation”. We have now crossed over to the audience’s application of the knowledge. By giving more than one opportunity, we are more likely to hit on what the majority of audience members are looking for. Importantly, by prior analysis of who is showing up the talk, we can anticipate common needs and circumstances. This allows us to get closer to the mark of listener reality when we explain our examples.

A simple rule of thumb should be 20% of what happened to us and 80% of the time on explaining why this will work for our audience. Our speaker, in this case, reversed those percentages and spent the majority of the time talking about what happened to them. The problem with this is we in the audience are not them and we have to parse out what we can apply from their story. It is much better of the speaker saves us that drama and they tell us what we can apply.

We draw out the key points we want to make for the audience, align our war stories with the points and then add a significant section in the talk on explaining why doing this is a great idea and specifically why it is a great idea bolstered with concrete cases and options. This is an unbeatable combination. We demonstrate in words that because we did it, they can, too. We draw out how it will work for the audience and convince them that it has a broader application than just working for us alone. We have to marshal the benefits of taking our advice, and the more concretely we can do that, the better.

Our speaker convinced us that it worked for them, but failed to make the case that it would work for us. They hinted at it, but statements are cheap and we sceptical folk want more evidence. We are all risk averse, so we want chapter and verse and solid provable details.

When constructing the talk, keep that 20%-80% dichotomy in mind. Certainly use ourselves as proof, but don’t rely on it exclusively. If we can talk about others doing marvellous things with our advice, that is the icing on the cake. We love to hear case studies and then draw our own conclusions on how much we can take from the example and apply it in our world. That idea is something we need to be constantly hammering away at too. Keep telling them to think how they can adapt it, and apply it for themselves. In this way, we can keep switching the focus back to the audience away from us and we will get the balance right.

Would the people who know you or meet you describe you as persuasive? Do you think you are persuasive enough? Persuasion power is the most important, but the most commonly lacking skill in the business world. Do it yourself trial and error wastes time and resources. It is time to change things up and get that key skill. There is a perfect solution for you- to LEARN MORE click here (https://bit.ly/3VhvR2B )

To get your free guide “How To Stop Wasting Money On Training” click here ( https://bit.ly/4agbvLj )

To get your free “Goal Setting Blueprint 2.0” click here (https://bit.ly/43o5FVK)

If you enjoy our content, then head over to www.dale-carnegie.co.jp and check out our Japanese and English seminars, workshops, course information and schedules and our whitepapers, guidebooks, training videos, podcasts, blogs.

About The Author

Dr. Greg Story, President Dale Carnegie Tokyo Training

Contact me at greg.story@dalecarnegie.com

Bestselling author of “Japan Sales Mastery” (the Japanese translation is "The Eigyo" (The営業), “Japan Business Mastery” and "Japan Presentations Mastery" and his new books "How To Stop Wasting Money On Training" and the translation "Toreningu De Okane Wo Muda Ni Suru No Wa Yamemashoo" (トレーニングでお金を無駄にするのは止めま

Dr. Greg Story is an international keynote speaker, an executive coach, and a thought leader in the four critical areas for business people: leadership, communication, sales and presentations. He leads the Dale Carnegie Franchise in Tokyo which traces its roots straight back to the very establishment of Dale Carnegie in Japan in 1963 by Mr. Frank Mochizuki.

He publishes daily blogs on LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter

Has 6 weekly podcasts:

1. Mondays - The Leadership Japan Series,

2. Tuesdays – The Presentations Japan Series

Every second Tuesday - ビジネス達人の教え

3. Wednesdays - The Sales Japan Series

4. Thursdays – The Leadership Japan Series

Also every second Thursday - ビジネスプロポッドキャスト

5. Fridays - The Japan Business Mastery Show

6. Saturdays – Japan’s Top Business Interviews

Has 3 weekly TV shows on YouTube:

1. Mondays - The Cutting Edge Japan Business Show

Also every Second Thursday - ビジネスプロTV

2. Fridays – Japan Business Mastery

3. Saturdays – Japan Top Business Interviews

In the course of his career Dr. Greg Story has moved from the academic world, to consulting, investments, trade representation, international diplomacy, retail banking and people development.

Growing up in Brisbane, Australia he never imagined he would have a Ph.D. in Japanese decision-making, become a 39 year veteran of Japan and run his own company in Tokyo.

Since 1971, he has been a disciple of traditional Shitoryu Karate (糸東流) and is currently a 6th Dan.

Bunbu Ryodo (文武両道-both pen & sword) is his mantra and he applies martial art philosophies and strategies to business.

  continue reading

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