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Exploring the coolest and most incredible stuff in science, from way back when dinosaurs roamed the Earth to a future where humans live in space! Fun Kids Science Weekly is hosted by Dan and is the perfect science podcast for kids and families everywhere. Each week, you'll find episodes from series like Deep Space High, Age of the Dinosaurs and Professor Hallux. There's also a special guest, top experts answering all your science questions and Dangerous Dan - something scientific that’s also ...
 
The award winning Science Weekly is the best place to learn about the big discoveries and debates in biology, chemistry, physics, and sometimes even maths. From the Guardian science desk Ian Sample, Hannah Devlin & Nicola Davis meet the great thinkers and doers in science and technology. Science has never sounded so good! We'd love to hear what you think, so get in touch via @guardianaudio or podcasts@theguardian.com
 
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This week, Nasa scientists smashed a spacecraft into an asteroid, more than 11m km from Earth. Most rocket scientists would wince at the thought, but the Double Asteroid Redirection Test, or DART, was purposefully designed to slam head-on into the asteroid Dimorphos. The aim is to nudge it off its current orbit, in an experiment that will assess th…
 
Show Notes: InSight hears meteoroid impacts on Mars | EarthSky (01:15) Since 2018, NASA’s InSight lander has been busy studying the interior of Mars detecting over 1,300 marsquakes NASA announced on September 19, 2022, that, for the first time, InSight has heard the impacts of four meteoroids as they crashed into the Martian surface. Detected the v…
 
Today is September 26th. In collaboration with the National Council of Severe Autism, we encourage all families to rethink their safety plan for wandering, fire, and other emergencies including national disasters like hurricanes by going to September26.org and doing a home checkup and prepare. Also, participate in a webinar at noon eastern today he…
 
Rats are the subject of Dangerous Dan this week, we also hear from Steve Backshall about his new book all about The Galapagos plus what he's doing to help combat climate change. There's more of your questions too including the big topic of black holes! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.…
 
The Breakthrough prizes are described by their Silicon Valley founders as ‘the Oscars of science’, and while they are not as glamorous, they do come with a $3m award. This year, one of the prizes was dished out to Prof Emmanuel Mignot at Stanford University and Masashi Yanagisawa at the University of Tsukuba for their work uncovering the cause of n…
 
The UK’s new health secretary, Thérèse Coffey, has not taken on an easy job. Almost two-thirds of trainee GPs plan to work part-time just a year after they qualify, reporting that the job has become too intense to safely work more. A record 6.8 million people are waiting for hospital treatment in England, and 132,139 posts lie vacant across the NHS…
 
Against a backdrop of a cost of living crisis caused in part by soaring energy prices, the UK’s new prime minister, Liz Truss, appointed MP Jacob Rees-Mogg as secretary of state for business and energy. In this role, Rees-Mogg will have to tackle these issues while being responsible for the UK’s legally binding target of net zero greenhouse gas emi…
 
More and more, psychiatrists are looking to psychedelic medication to help individuals who are resistant to other types of therapies. These include seizures, PTSD and depression. But can they help individuals with autism or ease autism-related problems or improve cognition? Two new studies on cannabis and one on ketamine are summarized in this week…
 
Show Notes: SpaceX’s Starlink internet reaches Antarctica, touching all 7 continents | New Atlas (01:16) Scientists with the United States Antarctic Program at the McMurdo Station are tapping into the space-based internet service, Starlink. Boosting the bandwidth for scientific research at the end of the Earth. Location of the Antarctic Program? Yo…
 
Why are we friends with people who smell similar to us? Why haven't more animals evolved with trunks? And why is water transparent? All this and more is answered this week! We hear about a failed rocket launch, a terrifying creature in Dangerous Dan, and we have a brand new friend who loves planes and can't wait to chat to you in Amy's Aviation! Se…
 
According to the World Health Organisation, air pollution causes 7 million premature deaths every year. We’ve known for a long time that air pollution causes lots of health problems, including lung cancer – but exactly how the two were linked was somewhat of mystery. Last week, a team from the Francis Crick Institute and University College London p…
 
As we collectively mark the loss of the longest-serving monarch in British history and all that she represented on a national scale, many people are feeling a much more personal impact. The Guardian’s science editor, Ian Sample, talks to Prof Michael Cholbi about what grief is, how losing a public figure can have such a profound impact on our lives…
 
Sometimes when the autism community hears the words “genetics research”, it conjures up images of using genetics to eliminate people with autism. In fact, that’s not the goal of genetics research, nor is it even possible. Recently, several new studies were publish which illustrate how genetics can be used to help people understand their diagnosis, …
 
Shows Notes: Neck-worn "bandage" sensors could better warn of concussions | New Atlas (01:09) One of the dangerous things about sports-related concussions is the fact that athletes may not realize they have one. A new sensor could let them (or their coaches) know. It would go on their neck, not their head. Helmet-integrated sensors, which have been…
 
How does your body defeat viruses? Does it really rain diamonds on Uranus? All of these questions are answered this week on the Fun Kids Science Weekly. We look at the White Lipped Peccary in Dangerous Dan, and in Science the news we hear about updates in NASA's latest rocket launch and about a runaway manatee! We hear our final episode from our Te…
 
According to a recent study, more than 14% of the world’s population probably has, or has had, tick-borne Lyme disease – an infection that can cause long and debilitating symptoms. That number is set to rise too, as climate and environment changes continue to increase tick populations and distribution. To help prevent some of these cases, pharmaceu…
 
Last week, a team of inspectors from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) arrived at Ukraine’s Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant. The plant was seized by Russian forces in early May and has recently been the target of sustained shelling, increasing the risk of a nuclear disaster. The head of the IAEA, Rafael Grossi, who is leading the inspe…
 
Show Notes: Researchers discover new way fat cells talk directly with the brain | New Atlas (01:36) Researchers at the Scripps Research Institute have discovered a novel communication pathway between fat cells and the brain. Brain doesn’t regulate fat burning by just slowly responding to hormonal signals in the blood. (traditional view) But can dir…
 
Would you drink sewage water? In Science in the News we look at scientists making toilet water safe to drink and what singing whales mean for climate change. We answer your questions on how do bubbles work and why don't atoms touch? And we are joined by Professor Hallux as we take a dive inside your mouth and we look at prosthetic blades with Techn…
 
It is now less than 100 days until Cop15, the UN convention on biological diversity. At these talks, which are taking place in Montreal, Canada in December, governments from around the world will come together to agree targets aimed at halting the destruction of the natural world and protecting biodiversity. With the Earth experiencing the largest …
 
What is a lightyear? Do cats pant like dogs? How have dinosaur feet evolved to hold their weight? Be wary of this weeks dangerous Dan, they might steal from you! And we hear what Professor Hallux has found inside your mouth and all about the amazing technology used in sport with Techno Mum! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.…
 
Holidaymakers heading to British beaches and rivers were faced with a very unpleasant problem this summer – raw sewage. The sewage system usually carries rainwater and dirty wastewater from bathrooms and kitchens to treatment works but during ‘exceptional events’ such as heavy rainfall, when it is likely to be overwhelmed, raw sewage can be diverte…
 
Show Notes: Eye tests can screen children for autism | Brighter Side News (01:11) According to a study from Washington State University researchers, measuring how the eyes’ pupils change in response to light could potentially be used to screen for autism in young children. Known as the pupillary light reflex Adjustments via the muscles connected to…
 
Outcome measures for clinical trials and understanding and determining gene x environment interactions have been two (of many) challenging questions for scientists. In the first study, we explain a new study that looks at the feasibility of three potential biomarkers that have the potential to look at presence of a diagnosis as well as effectivenes…
 
Many teenagers will receive their GCSE results today. These exams can have a significant impact on what they do next, so it can be a stressful time for students, their teachers and parents. Over the past decade, reported mental health problems among teenagers have been on the rise. A recent survey by the NHS statistics agency found rates of probabl…
 
About 325 million years ago, when Britain sat near the equator as part of the supercontinent Pangaea, two populations of a small, scaly, swamp-dwelling creature separated from each other. One of these lineages, over millions and millions of years, evolved into mammals. Our ancestors shared the planet with dinosaurs, survived an asteroid and made it…
 
Show Notes: Elon Musk's 'AI-Powered Tesla Bots' Will Replace 'Boring' Household Activities by 2022! | Tech Times (01:14) Information was recently reported on the AI robots being developed by Tesla giving us a clearer picture of what life will be like on Earth in the following decades. The Tesla Bot, about 172 cm tall (5’ 7”), seeks to gradually fre…
 
As Guy Fieri said “Cooking with kids is not just about ingredients, recipes, and cooking. It’s about harnessing imagination, empowerment, and creativity.” This week’s podcast produced by ASF intern Mia Kotikovski from Stony Brook University explores how cooking can be not just fun for autistic individuals, but how it can build healthy habits in eve…
 
Dr Joshua Pate joins us all the way from Austrailia to answer the question, why do we say 'Ow' when we get hurt? We hear about the daredevils chasing cyclones over the arctic and the German cats who are finally free from lockdown in Science in the News. Dan answers your science questions, including Why do Volcanos Erupt?! And as always we hear from…
 
‘In this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes.’ While Benjamin Franklin’s quote remains true for most, the same might not be said for some of the world’s billionaires. And their efforts to extend life are under way too. Most recently, a Silicon Valley startup called Altos Labs signed up a dream team of scientists, includi…
 
They may be one of the world’s favourite supplements but, according to a study from earlier this year, more than one in 10 fish oil capsules are rancid. Most of the oil comes from Peruvian anchovetas, a type of anchovy that is also used to feed pigs, poultry and farmed fish. And despite catching more than 4m tonnes a year of anchovetas to cater to …
 
Show Notes: Startup's new stunning kite can pull energy from the sky | Interesting Engineering (01:07) Several kite power companies are attempting to pull energy out of the sky, and they are succeeding. Kitekraft, a Munich-based company developing a kite power system is one of those companies working on this technology Their co-CEO and chief techno…
 
We want to hear YOUR Voices! Send in your science questions for Dan to answer at www.funkidslive.com and find the Fun Kids Science Weekly where you can record your own questions to be played on the show! In this weeks episode we find out how some coral has been able to regrow, some evil seagulls terrorising a town and the discovery of the biggest c…
 
Could the food we eat and the air we breathe be damaging our immune systems? The number of people with autoimmune diseases, from rheumatoid arthritis to type 1 diabetes, began to increase around 40 years ago in the west. Now, some are also emerging in countries that had never seen the diseases before. In this episode from January 2022, Ian Sample s…
 
In early April this year, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released a new report giving the world just 30 months to get greenhouse gas emissions falling. Beyond that, we’ll have missed our chance of limiting global heating to 1.5C. As this summer of heatwaves, droughts, wildfires and floods prove, going much above 1.5C will have truly …
 
Show Notes: Groundbreaking heart disease treatment uses ultrasound-assisted lasers | Brighter Side News (01:21) Atherosclerosis, a buildup of plaque, can lead to heart disease, artery disease, and chronic kidney disease and is traditionally treated by inserting and inflating a balloon to expand the artery. Rohit Singh, of the University of Kansas, …
 
Why do we wheeze? And what makes the James Webb Telescope better than the Hubble Telescope? This week we have Dhara Patel from the National Space Centre to tell us just that, as well as how the Webb telescope takes such in depth images! In Science in the News this week we learn about the fossil of the earliest know predator in Leicester, and who it…
 
James Lovelock, the creator of the Gaia hypothesis, died last Tuesday on his 103rd birthday. Known as something of a maverick, the scientist and inventor was one of the most influential thinkers of the past century. Our global environment editor, Jonathan Watts, tells Madeleine Finlay about spending time with Lovelock for his forthcoming biography,…
 
For decades, the absolute priority when rescuing victims after traffic accidents has been to minimise movement of the spine. Emergency services go to great lengths to keep the patient still while they are cut free from the wreckage, because a shift of just a millimetre could potentially lead to the person needing to use a wheelchair. Or at least, t…
 
Anxiety is common in people with autism – but is is different than other types of anxiety or similar? Is it part of the autism phenotype? When does it start and what triggers it? Two new studies which use a longitudinal design and examine the links between autism features, anxiety symptoms and brain development are summarized this week. It shows th…
 
News: Bedside AI warning system for sepsis reduces mortality by nearly 20% | New Atlas (01:23) Infections can trigger all kinds of reactions in the human body, and one of the most extreme is sepsis. Occurs as a result of an infection that triggers a severe immune response in the body. Begins with widespread inflammation and can end in blood clots, …
 
Is there evidence for a lost city? Why do we name storm names after people? We hear about the latest news on monkeys attacking people, a brand new space station, and the rise in JELLYFISH SWARMS! Dr Zoe Randle joins us to tell us more about the Big Butterfly Count and in Dangerous Dan its all about the BIGGEST thing in the Universe! As always Profe…
 
Liz Truss and Rishi Sunak have clashed on a number of issues as they battle to become the next prime minister. However, as heated debates hit our television screens, the climate emergency has been alarmingly absent from discussions. Ian Sample chats to Guardian environment correspondent Fiona Harvey about which candidate is ‘least bad’ when it come…
 
The impacts of the climate crisis are undeniably here. Heatwaves, droughts, wildfires and flooding are causing devastation around the world. And yet, we still aren’t seeing the drastic action that’s required to avert climate disaster. As things get worse, it’s easy to give up hope – but ‘climate doomism’ is just as dangerous as climate denial. Anan…
 
News: Serum from hibernating black bears boosts muscle mass in human cells | New Atlas (01:16) The incredible ability of bears to hibernate for months at a time has inspired some interesting lines of research around how their secrets might benefit human health, and among them is a focus on muscle wasting. First let’s talk about bear hibernation: Th…
 
Thanks to Dr. Susan Kuo at Broad Research Institute and MIT, there is an analysis of 17,000 individuals with autism across 4 different studies that all looked at how developmental milestones emerged. The results show a great deal of diversity – across different studies, time, intellectual disability and genetic background. Different groups of peopl…
 
We find out the oldest animal in the world that lives in the UK! And in recent news we hear about a foxes favourite food.... beware its a bit stinky, and VERY GROSS. As always we are answering your questions, this week it is on boredom and sleep! Techno Mum takes on her Tech Trivia Quiz on Recycling this week, can you score better than her? And we …
 
US president Joe Biden campaigned on climate issues, but recent events may have sounded a death knell for his promises. Last week, his attempts to pass sweeping climate legislation were thwarted – by a senator in his own party. And in June, a landmark US Supreme Court ruling has greatly limited the federal government’s ability to regulate emissions…
 
The H5N1 strain of avian influenza is sweeping across the world, killing millions of birds. In the UK, it’s causing disastrous losses of seabirds – populations that were already being hit by a number of threats, including habitat loss, overfishing and global heating. Biodiversity reporter Phoebe Weston tells Madeleine Finlay about how the virus mad…
 
News: New prehistoric human unknown to science discovered in Israel | The Jerusalem Post (01:20) A new type of early human previously not known to scientists has been discovered in Israel, Tel Aviv University and Hebrew University researchers announced Thursday, July 14th. They believe this new “Homo” species intermarried with Homo sapiens and was …
 
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