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The Foreign Affairs Interview

Foreign Affairs Magazine

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Foreign Affairs invites you to join its editor, Daniel Kurtz-Phelan, as he talks to influential thinkers and policymakers about the forces shaping the world. Whether the topic is the war in Ukraine, the United States’ competition with China, or the future of globalization, Foreign Affairs’ biweekly podcast offers the kind of authoritative commentary and analysis that you can find in the magazine and on the website.
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Foreign Affairs Inbox

Elliott School of International Affairs

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Nonpartisan analyses of critical foreign affairs issues, their challenges, and options for the international community. Produced by George Washington University's Elliott School of International Affairs.
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Welcome to the 2012 Johns Hopkins University Foreign Affairs Symposium, entitled The Paradox of Progress: Chasing Advancement Amidst Global Crisis. The 2012 Foreign Affairs Symposium invites you to take a deeper look into this paradox of progress: admire the things we have accomplished and take a critical view of the new and ongoing problems we must face and overcome. Whether in politics, the economy, the military, or the environment, our continued quest for advancement often creates new cha ...
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Martin Indyk has probably spent more time and energy than anyone else—certainly more than any other American—trying to find a path to peace among Israel, its neighbors, and the Palestinians. He’s worked on these issues for decades. Indyk served as President Barack Obama’s special envoy for the Israeli-Palestinian negotiations from July 2013 to June…
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More than any time in the last 75 years, we’re living in a world at war. Conflicts in Gaza and Ukraine dominate headlines. But that’s just part of it. Last year, Azerbaijan seized Nagorno-Karabakh, forcing thousands of ethnic Armenians to flee. There’s a full-scale civil war in Myanmar. In Africa, there is war in Sudan, Ethiopia, and Congo, and the…
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India has enormous momentum. Its population has surpassed China’s, making it the most populous country in the world. Its economy is expected to become the world’s third largest in the next few years. And, as much as any country, it seems positioned to take today’s geopolitical tensions and turn them to its advantage. The country’s prime minister, N…
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A year ago, protests began to rock Israel. For months, hundreds of thousands of demonstrators took to the streets to protest Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s efforts to weaken the country’s Supreme Court. Then came Hamas’s attack on October 7, and everything changed. “The war has caught Israel at perhaps its most divided moment in history,” writ…
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Four months after Hamas’s October 7 attack, the war in Gaza continues with little reason to think that Israel is particularly close to achieving its declared goals. Meanwhile, the Middle East is on the precipice of a full-scale regional war—and it may be that that war has already begun. Dahlia Scheindlin is a pollster, a policy fellow at Century In…
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Last fall, former U.S. Secretary of Defense Bob Gates took to the pages of Foreign Affairs to issue a warning: with America facing the most dangerous geopolitical landscape in decades, dysfunction in Washington threatened to turn that danger into disaster. Today, Russia and China are testing the international order. Iranian proxies are attacking U.…
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Ukraine may be facing the toughest chapter of its war since the first days of Russia’s invasion. The frontlines have changed little over the past year. And, in November, Ukraine’s top general, Valery Zaluzhny, used the word “stalemate” to describe the situation on the battlefield. In the West, the political tides may be shifting—especially in the U…
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There’s a growing sense that Russian President Vladimir Putin is in a pretty good position heading into 2024. Certainly that’s what Putin wants the rest of the world to think—that he can outlast Ukraine and its supporters in the West. Yet the situation looks more complicated on the ground in Russia. And there are few people better positioned to mak…
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Hamas’s attack on October 7 shocked the world and upended the status quo in the Middle East. As Israel’s war in Gaza continues, the two-state solution seems more out of reach than ever. And yet, close observers of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict understand that for there to ever be peace, a political solution must go hand in hand with any military…
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Most Americans think their country is in decline. So do their leaders. Both Joe Biden and Donald Trump have embraced foreign policies premised on the notion that the global order no longer serves American interests. But these pessimistic assumptions are wrong, Fareed Zakaria argues in a new essay for Foreign Affairs. Moreover, they are leading the …
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There is no doubt that China’s economy is struggling. After Chinese President Xi Jinping ended the country’s zero-COVID policy a year ago, most economists expected growth to surge—but that never really happened, and deeper problems became apparent. So what are the exact causes of China’s stagnation? The economists Adam Posen, Zongyuan Zoe Liu, and …
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From killer robots to smarter logistics, artificial intelligence promises to change the way the U.S. military fights and develops weapons. As this new technology comes online, the opportunities are coming into focus—but so are the dangers. In a new piece for Foreign Affairs, Michèle Flournoy argues the U.S. military has no choice but to move forwar…
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Today we explore Kim Yo Jung, Kim Jong Un’s sister, and her official role in North Korea. She first made her international debut in 2018 and has continued to dominate North Korean politics alongside her brother, with many scholars considering her to be a potential successor to Kim Jong Un. We are joined today by Dr. Sung-Yoon Lee to discuss why he …
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There is no end in sight to Israel’s war against Hamas in Gaza. But even as fighting rages, questions abound about what happens when it finally stops. What can be salvaged from the wreckage? Will Hamas survive, if not as an organization, then as an ideology? Who will govern Gaza? What type of leadership will be needed on both sides to broker any ty…
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As the war in Gaza continues, the question of Hamas’s future has become paramount. But it has also raised questions about the years of Hamas rule in Gaza—and the group’s support among Palestinians. Amaney Jamal is dean of the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs and co-founder of Arab Barometer, which conducts public opinion researc…
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Realism has been the dominant theory of international relations since its conception, and within the realist school, the balance of power theory is a core tenet and posits that in order to survive as independent entities in an anarchic system, states are compelled to increase their power and balance against a potential hegemon. This theory was modi…
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In Ukraine, where war with Russia grinds on, the dominant question has become: can one side outlast the other? This is especially true as both sides face another grueling winter. One thing Russia has in ample supply is men. But how it treats its soldiers is having an effect on the battlefield, explains Dara Massicot, who has studied the Russian mil…
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Two weeks ago, there was reason to think that the Middle East was becoming more stable than it had been for years. Washington was pushing for normalization between Israel and Saudi Arabia as one piece of a broader attempt to reduce the U.S. role in the region and focus on other priorities. Hamas’s attack on Israel on October 7 shattered those hopes…
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The 2023 Guatemalan elections were closely watched this past summer, especially following the anti-democratic efforts that led to Bernardo Arévalo’s Semilla party being suspended after unexpectedly emerging as one of the two victors of the first round of elections in late June. Arévalo eventually beat out former first lady Sandra Torres in the Augu…
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In March 2020, as COVID-19 spread across the globe, the Chinese government expelled a handful of U.S. journalists from China. The move came weeks after the Trump administration curtailed the number of Chinese citizens who could work in the United States for state-run Chinese news organizations. Among the journalists forced to leave China was Ian Jo…
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Building closer ties with India has become a top priority for U.S. foreign policy. In June, the White House hosted Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi for a lavish state dinner. The thinking is that India will be a key U.S. partner in its competition with China. But is Washington making the wrong assumptions about India? How far do the two countrie…
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As some countries, including India, China, the UAE, and Turkey, have started to move away from the U.S. Dollar as the standard for international trade, the government is faced with many questions regarding the importance of Dollar Dominance. In this episode, Saleha Mohsin, senior Washington correspondent for Bloomberg News, joins us to overview the…
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Ever since the company OpenAI unveiled ChatGPT last year, there have been constant warnings about the effects of artificial intelligence on just about everything. Ian Bremmer, the founder of the Eurasia Group, and Mustafa Suleyman, founder of the AI companies DeepMind and Inflection AI, highlight what may be the most significant effect in a new ess…
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After World War II, an idea took hold: economic interdependence between countries would help prevent war. But lately, faith in this idea has wavered, and terms like “decoupling,” “friend shoring,” and “de-risking” are dominating the debates around trade in Washington and beyond. Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, director general of the World Trade Organization,…
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There’s a near consensus today that U.S. foreign policy has entered a new era. But how to define and navigate this new era is much less clear. Richard Fontaine, the CEO of the Center for a New American Security, has held senior positions across the U.S. government—in the Senate, at the State Department and National Security Council, and as an advis…
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In this episode, we discuss Argentina’s worsening economic crisis and ongoing negotiations with the International Monetary Fund (IMF). Argentina is facing historic annual rates of inflation that have reached over 100% this past June. How did Argentina’s situation become this dire? How is Economic Minister Sergio Massa, who is set to be the ruling P…
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